Flat Feet

An arch along the bottom of the foot is part of our normal support system, but many people have very low or “fallen” arches. This condition is often referred to as “flat feet” or “flatfoot.”

Having flat feet does not always mean you will experience any problems from the condition, and treatment for it is not always necessary. However, flat feet should be addressed if they are causing pain or discomfort.

How Do Flat Feet Happen?

Most of us do not have arches when we are born. As we develop and learn to walk, our arches gradually form and prepare us for a lifetime of movement.

It is common to see flat feet in children, but there is not much cause for concern while young. But once we have reached maturity, arches simply aren’t going to come in if they haven’t already.

Additionally, an adult can have arches but lose them over time. An injury can weaken the support structures of an arch, causing it to fall. Likewise, simple age and wear on the feet can have a similar effect.

When Are Flat Feet a Problem?

Having flat feet can alter the structure of the foot and the way that weight is distributed over it. In some cases, this can cause excess force or pressure to be exerted on certain areas of the foot, causing pain in the heel or arch area. This type of pain tends to grow worse with activity.

Flat feet can also affect the way the body moves and cause other muscles to act in different ways to adjust to this motion. This has the potential of causing pain in the ankles, knees, and even hips as the body “falls out of alignment.”

Even if your child currently has flat feet and it is not causing them any problems, we still recommend that they come in for periodic evaluations. If we can catch that the arches are not making progress early, we can take preventative steps to avoid potential pain later in adulthood.

When Are Flat Feet a Problem?

Having flat feet can alter the structure of the foot and the way that weight is distributed over it. In some cases, this can cause excess force or pressure to be exerted on certain areas of the foot, causing pain in the heel or arch area. This type of pain tends to grow worse with activity.

Flat feet can also affect the way the body moves and cause other muscles to act in different ways to adjust to this motion. This has the potential of causing pain in the ankles, knees, and even hips as the body “falls out of alignment.”

Even if your child currently has flat feet and it is not causing them any problems, we still recommend that they come in for periodic evaluations. If we can catch that the arches are not making progress early, we can take preventative steps to avoid potential pain later in adulthood.

How Are Flat Feet Treated?

Flat feet that are not causing any discomfort do not require any treatment. If pain and other problems can be traced to flat feet, however, then action should be taken to address the problem. This is also true for children and teens who may have problems from flat feet, even if those arches are still developing.

Diagnosing flat feet is relatively easy. It can often be determined via an examination of the feet, although an imaging test might also be requested to determine the extent of the condition and rule out other potential causes of pain. It is also very helpful to bring in a pair of shoes you have worn for at least several months, as their wear patterns can tell us a lot about the way you walk.

After an evaluation, we may recommend one or more treatments for your flat feet. They may include:

  • Orthotic inserts that are specially prescribed according to your foot shape. These inserts provide support and cushioning exactly where it’s needed and can offload excess weight and pressure from areas that need it.
  • Stretching exercises that can help relieve pain, especially if a shortened Achilles tendon is a factor.
  • Physical therapy to aid in movement techniques, especially if you are a runner whose flat feet have been increasing your risk of overuse injuries.

If your flat feet are giving you trouble, or you aren’t sure what’s causing your pain, give Trinity Foot Center a call at (972) 293-9650. Our office in DeSoto is always happy to accept new patients.

    Contact us
    Office Hours
    Monday 8:30am - 5pm
    Tuesday 8:30am - 5pm
    Wednesday 8:30am - 5pm
    Thursday 8:30am - 6pm
    Friday 8:30am - Noon

    REQUEST AN APPOINTMENT

    2 + 2 =

    By submitting this form you agree to the terms of our 'Privacy Policy.'

    Location

    1801 N. Hampton Road
    Suite 340
    DeSoto, TX 75115

    Inside the Inwood National Bank Building on the 3rd Floor

    Contact

    p. (972) 293-9650
    f.  (972) 291-2533

    Pin It on Pinterest